What Are Uterine Fibroids?

Fibroids can vary a lot in size, shape, and location. They can show up in your uterus, uterine wall, or on its surface. They can also attach to your uterus by a stalk- or stem-like structure.
Some are so small that your doctor can’t even see them with the naked eye. Others grow in big masses that can affect the size and shape of your uterus.
Uterine fibroids usually appear in women of childbearing age — generally between 30-40 years old, but they can show up at any age. They’re more common in African-American women than in white women, and they also tend to show up earlier and grow quicker in African-American women. Doctors don’t know why that is.

Symptoms of Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids, which your doctor may call leiomyomas or myomas, are muscular tumors that can grow on your uterus. They rarely turn into cancer, and if you get them it doesn’t mean you’re more likely to get uterine cancer.
Fibroids can vary a lot in size, shape, and location. They can show up in your uterus, uterine wall, or on its surface. They can also attach to your uterus by a stalk- or stem-like structure.
Some are so small that your doctor can’t even see them with the naked eye. Others grow in big masses that can affect the size and shape of the uterus.
Uterine fibroids usually appear in women of childbearing age — generally between 30 and 40 years old, but they can show up at any age. They’re also more common in African-American women than in white women, and tend to show up earlier and grow quicker in African-Americans, as well. Doctors don’t know why that is.

Causes of Uterine Fibroids

Experts don’t know exactly why you get fibroids. Hormones and genetics might make you more likely to get them.
Genetics. Researchers have found genetic differences between fibroids and normal cells in the uterus.
Other growth factors. Substances in your body that help with tissue upkeep, such as insulin-like growth factor, may play a part in fibroid growth.
Extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM makes your cells stick together. Fibroids have more ECM than normal cells, which makes them fibrous. ECM also keeps growth factors in it and causes cells to change.

Risk Factors of Uterine Fibroids

A few things can raise your chances of developing uterine fibroids, such as:
You’re more likely to get fibroids if your mom or sister has had them.

Uterine Fibroid Diagnosis

Your doctor may suspect you have uterine fibroids just from feeling your uterus during a routine pelvic exam. If the shape of your uterus feels irregular or unusually large, they may order further tests, such as:

Uterine Fibroid Treatment

There are many ways to treat fibroids. The treatment that works best for you will depend on whether you’re having symptoms, want to get pregnant, your age, and where your fibroids are.
Watchful waiting. If you have only mild symptoms — or no symptoms — your doctor may suggest you simply wait and see. Fibroids aren’t cancerous, and they grow slowly or not at all. They also may shrink or go away after menopause.
Medications. Medications for fibroids treat your symptoms. Fibroids won’t go away but might shrink with some medications. They can also help with symptoms like pain and bleeding.
Oral birth control can reduce bleeding. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen can help ease pain. Vitamins and iron supplements can help with energy if you’re bleeding heavily and have anemia as a result.
Other medications include:

Uterine Fibroid Prevention

Fibroids can’t be prevented, but there is some research that suggests certain lifestyle habits can reduce your chances.
One study found that high-sugar diets may be linked to a higher risk in some women. Another study found that eating fresh fruits and cruciferous vegetables like arugula, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, and turnip greens could lower your odds. Cruciferous vegetables are rich in beta-carotene, folate, vitamins C, E, and K, and other minerals. They’re also full of fiber.
Regular exercise also can lower your chances of uterine fibroids.

Hospitals

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Sakra World Hospital, Bangalore

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GarbhaGudi IVF Centre, Bangalore

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Brains Neuro Spine Centre, Bangalore

Hormones. Estrogen and progesterone are the hormones that make the lining of your uterus thicken every month during your period. They also seem to affect fibroid growth. When hormone production slows down during menopause, fibroids usually shrink.
Uterine fibroids, which your doctor may call leiomyomas or myomas, are muscular tumors that can grow on your uterus. They rarely turn into cancer, and if you get them it doesn’t mean you’re more likely to get uterine cancer.

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